10th Remember a Charity Week busts some of the myths around leaving a legacy

18 September 2019

The 10th Remember a Charity week, which launches this week, is using a quirky format which imitates a 1970s-inspired popular TV show to explain some of the most common misconceptions around legacy giving.

The format tackles the following myths:

Myth:     Leaving a gift in your will is only for the rich and famous

Reality:   Every single person can leave a gift in their will

Myth:     Most people in the UK assume that you can’t leave money in your Will to family as well as your favourite charity

Reality:   This is simply not true.  After taking care of your loved ones, you can do both. And it doesn’t have to be money you can leave to charity, it can be a small percentage of your estate or an item   

Myth:     Leaving a small gift in your will to your favourite cause won’t make any difference.

Reality:   The truth is, when combined with other people’s gifts, it could make a huge difference.  In fact, many charities wouldn’t exist if it were not for gifts in wills.  Large or small amounts left to any charity in a will really could make all the difference.

Myth:     Leaving a gift in a will is complex and difficult

Reality:   Leaving a gift in a will is easier than you think, whether you are considering revisions to an existing Will or making one for the first time. A professionally written Will ensures that your wishes are clear and your affairs are in order and you could also save your loved ones from additional administrative demands at a difficult and stressful time.     

UFAW’s work to reduce animal suffering and to improve animal welfare is only possible because of the generous support of those who leave a legacy.  Gifts left in wills make up over 50% of our income, so every one is extremely valuable to us. Gifts left in wills have enabled UFAW to develop from simple beginnings in 1926 to become an organisation that has championed the application of science in the service of animal welfare. 

UFAW has put together a simple guide which should be of some assistance to you when speaking to a solicitor and making your Will which can be downloaded free here (