UFAW announces virtual conference on Recent Advances in Animal Welfare Science

Following on from the success and popularity of previous conferences, UFAW is holding its eighth conference on Recent advances in animal welfare science and has once again attracted a diverse and dynamic programme of speakers from across the world.

This year, the conference will again take place online over the two days.  It features over 40 presentations on subjects ranging from whether flat-faced dogs are really unhealthier than other dogs to exploring oxidative stress as a potential indicator of animal welfare, and the development of tools for farmers to self-assess the welfare of their poultry and pigs in organic and outdoor systems.  In addition to these talks, the conference will feature over 110 thought-provoking poster presentations covering a wide range of topics and animal species.

The conference is part of UFAW’s ongoing commitment to improving animal welfare through increased scientific understanding of animals’ needs and how best these can be met.  These conferences are invaluable in bringing together scientists, veterinarians, policy makers and others from around the world to share knowledge, the latest advances and to exchange views and ideas. 

This virtual conference is free to attend but delegates are being asked to consider making a donation to UFAW which, as a charity, relies on donations and legacies to continue.

The full conference programme, including speakers and registration details can be viewed on the UFAW website – ufaw.org.uk/conf2021.

-ENDS-

Notes to Editors:

The Universities Federation for Animal Welfare (UFAW) is an internationally recognised, independent scientific and educational animal welfare charity. It works to improve knowledge and understanding of animals’ needs in order to achieve high standards of welfare for farm, companion, research, captive wild animals and those with which we interact in the wild.

UFAW improves animal welfare worldwide through its programme of awards, grants and scholarships; by educational initiatives, especially at university and college level; by providing information in books, videos, reports and in its scientific journal Animal Welfare; by providing expert advice to governments and others, including for legislation and ‘best practice’ guidelines and codes; and by working with animal keepers, scientists, vets, lawyers and all those who care about animals.

This work relies on the support of members, subscribers and donors. 

The first “recent advances in animal welfare science” conference took place in Birmingham in 2008.